• Advertisement

  • Poppy crosswalk is there for respect and remembrance

    I am a member of the Royal Canadian Legion 264 branch.  I believe the original intent was not to be disrespectful but to be respectful in remembrance of our Fallen.  I know that approval to use the poppy symbol should have had approval from our National Headquarters in Ottawa, but how would a 14 year old have thought of that first.  

    Just think of the approximately 3600 crosses that are set up in the field of crosses on Memorial Drive; all of these Crosses, Stars of David and Crescent/Stars indicate the names of our soldiers fallen in battle and/or served in combat for Canada but none, of course, are buried at this site.  Their names, rank, date of death and some with pictures and mementoes are drawn to us for remembrance and respect.  The crosses are draped with flags of the soldiers’ origin and pinned with a poppy for remembrance, as those original poppies were from Flanders Fields noted by John McCrae in 1915.  I think the universal acceptance of the Poppy as a symbol of remembrance should be allowed for just this purpose.  

    Think of all those young Canadian children who are going to draw pictures at school about Remembrance Day using the poppy in their pictures.  The poppy is truly the connection of the fallen and the veterans to the youth of today, where no controversy should be made over its use or purpose.  Poppies are the symbol of remembrance and they will never die as they regenerate every year all over the world.  

    Our Poppy Crosswalk is at the entrance to our lakeside Cenotaph and is there to respect and remember our fallen and veterans.   Thank you to all our fallen soldiers, veterans and currently serving military for keeping and maintaining our safety and security of our country and freedom.

    Myron  C.  Kirik